Freedom at Issue:

Insights on the global struggle for democracy

Shannon O’Toole

Prime Minister Milo Đukanović asserted late last year that Montenegro’s journalists enjoy “absolute freedom of expression.” Over the subsequent weeks, reporter Lidija Nikčević of the independent daily Dan was severely beaten with a bat, bombs struck the office (pictured) of another daily, Vijesti, as well as the home of one of its columnists, and arsonists torched one of the paper’s vehicles, marking the fifth such attack on Vijesti since 2011. This is only a sample of the unchecked aggression faced by independent journalists in Montenegro.

Regions: 
Craig Blackburn

While the coup itself appeared deceptively simple, governing Thailand will be a more drawn out, complicated, and potentially bloody affair.

Regions: 
Arch Puddington

In the wake of Narendra Modi’s overwhelming victory in India’s recent elections, commentators have noted the many, daunting challenges facing the new prime minister of the world’s most populous democracy.

Regions: 
Sarah Cook

The Chinese regime’s never-ending struggle to suppress information that could threaten its grip on power keeps citizens in the dark on topics of vital importance. But it has also taken a growing toll on U.S. media attempting to report on the world’s second-largest economy, and directly affected other businesses operating in China, with real consequences for U.S. investors.

Mehrunisa Qayyum


In most elections, the voters’ central dilemma is deciding whether to vote for candidate A, B, or C. However, in Egypt’s upcoming May 26–27 presidential election, citizens and organizing blocs are understandably asking themselves whether to vote at all.

Robert W. Orttung
Christopher Walker

The repressive “bloggers law” signed by President Vladimir V. Putin on May 6 says a good deal about the troubling decline of free expression in Russia. But at a time when Putin’s governance system is mutating from a venal, kleptocratic regime into a belligerent, revanchist power, what the Russian authorities do at home has important effects on the media environment in countries on Russia’s borders, and beyond.

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Karin Deutsch Karlekar

Among the findings of Freedom House’s recently released press freedom report, the most contentious has been the downgrade of Turkey from the Partly Free category to Not Free. Below are responses Freedom House has given to common questions from Turkish journalists.

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Leon Willems
Arch Puddington

Over the past decade, global press freedom has experienced an alarming downward spiral. The reasons for the decline are complex, but one of the most important, if least appreciated, factors is a pattern of media ownership that contributes to biased, unprofessional, and in extreme cases propagandistic journalism.

Alexander Brockwehl

While Ecuador's president Rafael Correa has been promoting himself through a public-relations campaign abroad, he has ratcheted up the suppression of critical voices within his own country. In Freedom House’s recently released report Freedom of the Press 2014, Ecuador was rated Not Free for the second consecutive year. And as the report suggests, the developments over the past year were more disturbing than just a continuing negative trend.

Regions: 
Cathal Gilbert

While voters in tomorrow’s elections face a very real choice in terms of the economic future of the country, parties have been less vocal about how they plan to address the current threats to South Africa’s democracy.

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